Dear Alumni,

In December 2014, the Division of Mathematical Sciences at the National Science Foundation recommended a ramp-down of the Institute for Mathematics and its Applications (IMA). This decision ends the IMA's successful run, which began in 1982. This site is created to record the impact the IMA has had on the mathematical sciences community, and the larger scientific and engineering communities. Please take a minute to share your thoughts. Stories about how the IMA impacted your research or your career are particularly appropriate. Thank you.

Notifications:
1. Please do not use this forum to express your opinion about the NSF decision.
2. Submissions will be monitored. Any inappropriate submissions will be deleted.

Comments

Affiliation: 
Stanford University
Current Position: 
Ph.D. Student

I spent six weeks at the IMA as part of the MAXIMA REU in the summer of 2012. It was probably the most important formative academic experience I had as an undergraduate, and is a big part of why I have decided to pursue a Ph.D. The people there are top-notch, the research is relevant and strong, and the MAXIMA REU in particular was superbly run.

Affiliation: 
University of Victoria, Canada
Current Position: 
Professor, Mechanical Engineering

I spent 9 months at the IMA as a "visiting postdoc" in 1999/2000. The stay at the IMA greatly expanded my horizon, as it exposed me to most important researchers in my field, whom I met, interacted with, learned from, and worked with. I trace the work I do today in larger part back to my time at the IMA, and the contacts I made were long-lasting, and beneficial. I loved all about the IMA: the setting, the large number of workshops that covered a wide spectrum, as well as the social life. In short: the IMA shaped my career for the best!

Affiliation: 
Indiana University
Current Position: 
Professor

I was lucky to have been a graduate student at Minnesota when the IMA first took over most of the top floor of Vincent Hall. All the activity made a great impression on me. Returning for both year-long programs in dynamical systems had distinct
impacts on my career. The 1989-90 program fostered the study of inertial manifolds and, while that in 1997-98
enabled dynamical systems approaches for the Navier-Stokes equations. The latter ultimately led me to work in turbulence,
which in turn was further stimulated by workshops in 2002 (Mathematics of Geosciences), 2010 (Complex Fluids and
Complex Flows) and 2012 (Infinite Dimensional and Stochastic Systems and Their Applications).

My students have also benefitted from the IMA. One was an IMA postdoc 2009-2011, and two others participated in a special workshop, Careers and Opportunities in Industry for Mathematical Scientists, in 2014.

I always felt the IMA was well run, the staff responsive and knowledgable. Representing my institution at several IMA annual meetings, I came to appreciate the careful planning that goes into each scientific program. It was facility for the greater mathematical community, guided not just by its able directors, but also the community itself.

I recall how Willard Miller liked to joke at the start of each workshop that "The IMA teas are not really known for their tea."
Once, Don Aronson leaned over to me and mumbled that "it's not really known for its wine, either." What it is known
for is great gatherings of mathematicians, engineers and scientists to make progress on a variety of research challenges.
We should all toast it with something supreme.

Affiliation: 
University of New Mexico
Current Position: 
Professor Emaritus

I attended the May 04 Workshop on Compatible Spatial Discretizations for Partial Differential Equations and the June 89 Workshop on Symbolic Computation Methods in Partial Differential Equations. Both had a strong influence on my research.

Affiliation: 
Inria, Saclay
Current Position: 
postdoc

I have been a participant of three workshops organized by IMA at the time when I was a postdoc at University of Pennsylvania. I have found the workshops to be a great opportunity to learn and to exchange ideas. IMA is the unique place where people form pure and applied mathematics are coming to talk to each other. Those three workshops were for me a constant source of inspiration and help me defined new directions of my research. The IMA team was always extremely helpful.
I have not used the past tense when speaking about IMA and I hope we will not have to use that tense. In my opinion this place have to continue its mission and guide young and senior mathematicians into applied mathematics.

Affiliation: 
Technion - Israel Institute of Technology
Current Position: 
Professor of Mathematics

My first visit at the IMA took place during my postdoc years, back in the 1980's. I spent there two very productive months, in the framework of a special year on Graph Theory. The activities were highly stimulating, and the atmosphere was very pleasant. The daily tea and social events were great opportunities to form ties and collaborate. I worked there with more established mathematicians (Daniel Kleitman, Zoltan Furedi, Jerry Griggs). Two papers came out of these collaborations, and more importantly, the professional ties formed at the IMA with these people are maintained to this day.
Recently (last November) I visited the IMA again, for a conference on Geometric and Enumerative Combinatorics. I was happy to see that in the 26 years that passed since my first visit, the IMA has expanded its activities and modernized its facilities, and the campus of the University of Minnesota looks new and impressive. But the IMA kept the old flame and the successful format that has been tested over time.

Affiliation: 
Rice University
Current Position: 
Professor Emeritus

I attended two workshops that focussed on mathematics and neuroscience. Both drew important people in the field. That coupled with the work environment provided by the IMA, many important technical interactions occurred that changed and/or improved my own work. Both were the most productive workshops I attended.

Affiliation: 
SISSA, Trieste
Current Position: 
Professor

I visited IMA for two weeks in July 2009.
The environment at IMA was for research: the collegues that were visiting the institute at the same time period were among the best mathematicians working on hyperbolic PDEs and I had the opportunity to interact with them. The facilities were perfect, so I could just care about the math: it has been very enjoyable!

Affiliation: 
Rice University
Current Position: 
Professor

The IMA has been a great resource for me over the years. I have attended at least half a dozen of the IMA workshops, more than any other Mathematics Institute, and found them quite stimulating. The IMA has been very efficient in bringing together people from different backgrounds in a productive way, and new insights and ideas often result. In fact I owe the IMA one of my current research directions - on a role of chemotaxis in biological reactions, and on the influence of fluid flow on these processes. It came into life thanks to the talk of oceanographer Jeff Weiss which I attended at Turbulent Mixing workshop at the IMA in April 2010. Other IMA workshops I attended have also been a great opportunity to broaden my perspective and learn of new directions and applied problems related to my expertise. Having a large, varied, and very high quality University of Minnesota Department of Mathematics has been an additional source of attraction for my visits to IMA.

Affiliation: 
University of Florida
Current Position: 
Professor

The IMA has had an enormous impact on my career. My first visit, in 2004, was to attend a New Directions workshop in Computational Topology organized by Herbert Edelsbrunner and John Harer. At this meeting I met a pair of new collaborators, leading to two papers, and learned about a new field. My research emphasis took a turn into this area and I have been working on problems in topological data analysis and discrete Morse theory ever since. I have no doubt that without this workshop I would not have shifted my focus and might still be working on the same problems I began early in my career.

Affiliation: 
University of British Columbia
Current Position: 
Professor Emeritus

My IMA visits have been important. Most recently, a meeting in the topic year on neural dynamics acquainted me with a community and line of work in this area of which I had not been aware. This eventually resulted in several new contacts, new ideas, and a new and fruitful direction of my work within stochastic neural dynamics. Thank you IMA!

Affiliation: 
Penn (Univ. of PA)
Current Position: 
Professor

This will be short. I was a guest at the inaugural Abel conference in honor of John Tate who is a "native son " of the Twin Cities. The conference was a success due to the careful planning of its organizing committee and the IMA. The IMA went out of its way to insure our comfort, our enjoyment of a good conference and the staff were very pleasant and competent people (guaranteeing all the good things). I congratulate the IMA on our experience.

Affiliation: 
UBC Dept of Mathematics
Current Position: 
Professor

I attended an IMA workshop on cell motility (organized by Alex Mogilner and Julie Theriot). At that workshop, I met and interacted with Prof John Condeelis. As a direct result, we started collaborating on joint research. So far, there have been 3 publications that arose from that collaboration. We are still working together on joint experiment-modelling research, with many fruitful interactions over the past years. Thanks IMA!!

Affiliation: 
McGill University
Current Position: 
Professor

I have been very fortunate to be able to attend several wonderful workshops at the IMA over the years. These have payed a very important role in helping me develop research programs, and also in making it possible for me to start some very fruitful collaborations. The quality of the scientific environment at the IMA, the timeliness of the programs and the outstanding professionalism of the staff have been exemplary.

Affiliation: 
University of the Pacific
Current Position: 
Associate Professor

In the fall of 1998 I had the privilege of participating in one of IMA workshops for graduate students. I can honestly say that that was one of the best research experiences of my life! My group ended up working on some interesting problems related to ultra high precision global positioning system. That was my first real encounter with applied mathematics--an encounter which had a formative affect on my later career and which I could not have had within the walls of academia. Now it has been almost two decades since that workshop, yet I still keep in touch with some of the group members. And I can only hope that the powers that be will come to their senses and restore the funding for such a wonderful institution. In the meantime, thank you, IMA, from the bottom of my heart.

Affiliation: 
University of Athens
Current Position: 
Professor of Computer Science

I spent a few, very exciting weeks at IMA in 2006, during the focus on Applications of algebraic geometry, where I also co-organized one of the Workshops (which actually led to a volume published by IMA). IMA and its staff provided an excellent environment for research, which stimulated a number of projects, some of which are still central in my work. The Workshop participants as well as the long-term visitors, representing various fields and schools of thought, made for a great scientific environment, which would be hard to find in any other context.

Affiliation: 
U of Waterloo
Current Position: 
Postdoc fellow

I attended the 2-week summer course on statistics and machine learning from June 17-28, 2013. Although the time is short, I benefited a lot from that course, which includes tutorial-type talks, computer lab, also talks on most recent research progress, and team work and presentation. It is a very good opportunity for young researchers like me to interact and communicate with others including senior professors. I got chance to talk with other graduate students and also junior faculties and learned their research in statistics, imaging, and machine learning. I did optimization, and the course gave me a broad view of how optimization can be applied in statistics and machine learning. My PhD thesis includes a large part about the application of optimization in machine learning.

Affiliation: 
Iowa State University
Current Position: 
associate professor

My research focus is on numerical analysis and scientific computing. I have to admit the best workshops I have ever attended are those held at IMA. From the beginning career as a young researcher, I have constantly participated IMA workshops. Here at IMA, we receive world class top mathematician presentations. I have learned tremendous new knowledge from IMA workshops and get to know other mathematicians in the field. Again, IMA is the best math institute in my mind.

Affiliation: 
Carnegie Mellon University
Current Position: 
Professor

I am most grateful to the IMA for having hosted the Hot Topics Workshop: Mixed-Integer Nonlinear Optimization: Algorithmic Advances and Applications, November 17-21, 2008 http://www.ima.umn.edu/2008-2009/SW11.17-21.08/. This was the first ever workshop on this topic that planted the seed for subsequent workshops on mixed-integer nonlinear programming (MINLP) as documented in http://minlp.cheme.cmu.edu/. MINLP deals with nonlinear optimization problems involving both discrete and continuous variables, having many applications in engineering design and manufacturing, and in energy and financial systems among others. Despite its great importance, MINLP had not received much attention in the literature.
The IMA event was an outstanding workshop that was organized by Jon Lee and Sven Leyffer. It brought together for the first time international, researchers in the areas of chemical and mechanical engineering, operations research, mathematics and computer science who had an interest in this new and emerging topic. Without this workshop it is doubtful that MINLP would have risen to the level of attention it has received over the last 7 years. Thanks again to the IMA for hosting such a great and important workshop.

Affiliation: 
Rutgers University
Current Position: 
Distinguished Professor

I was fortunate to attend two events at IMA: the 2002 conference on Foundations of Computational Mathematics (FoCM) http://www.damtp.cam.ac.uk/user/na/FoCM/FoCM02/ (as part of the workshop on Complexity that was organized by Gregorio Malajovich and Pascal Koiran), and the 2007 workshop on Complexity, Coding, and Communications http://www.ima.umn.edu/2006-2007/W4.16-20.07/ (part of the Thematic Year on Applications of Algebraic Geometry http://www.ima.umn.edu/2006-2007/).

The 2002 meeting got me thinking more about questions related to numerical analysis and the Blum-Shub-Smale model, which eventually morphed into a paper (http://ftp.cs.rutgers.edu/pub/allender/slp.pdf); thus it was definitely a meeting that had an influence on me.

The 2007 meeting was notable for the effect it had in furthering the program of applying the techniques of algebraic geometry to questions in computational complexity, which continues to be an important research direction.

IMA has played a very significant role in the development of mathematical and computational research. This list of testimonials speaks volumes.

Affiliation: 
Oakland University
Current Position: 
Professor Emeritus

I was invited to participate in a workshop that brought together biologists and applied mathematicians. It was organized by Dr. Lisa Fauci and it was the beginning of a long term collaboration with the mathematicians at Tulane. It allowed me to present the details of my newly published computer model on the working mechanism of cilia and flagella. The meeting was well attended by important contacts in both the mathematics field and the biological community interested in cilia and flagella. It gave me an important outlet for my work and resulted in several lasting professional relationships. The small meeting format and casual atmosphere were very conducive to brainstorming and formulating plans for developing my model. The input of other investigators that were able to provide a critical view of my work was very constructive. Although it was a one time experience I think it was very valuable and unique.

Affiliation: 
University of North Carolina, Greensboro
Current Position: 
Associate Professor

I went to one conference and it was great. I was able to make and renew a dozen mathematical contacts and got very valuable directions and cues for my research that I would not have been able to get any other way. I've sent a student to two of the conferences and it was invaluable for him to see what the research part of a career was all about. Having two institutions, my university and the IMA, support this student was really important to me. I had some money for this purpose, but this support doubled the opportunities I could give him. A colleague of mine spent a semester there and he has reorganized his research career around his experiences there. It is a very valuable place. If the IMA did not exist, it would have to be reinvented and recreated.

Affiliation: 
Iowa State University
Current Position: 
Professor of Mathematics

I have visited the IMA for few months and I attended one special topic course on Applied Algebraic Topology. Also I asked and received help when I was trying to connect with industry to learn about applications of control theory in pharmacokinetics. In all these occasions the interaction led to new ideas both in mathematics and in applications.
Thank you IMA for continuous support and assistance

Affiliation: 
Temple University
Current Position: 
Professor of Mathematics

I was a young researcher in January 1992, and was lucky to have been invited to participate in the Workshop on Linear Algebra, Markov Chains and Queuing Models. This was one of the most stimulating events I have attended in my career. It brought together scientist from different areas (as the title of the workshop indicates), and it really worked. So much so, that I was jealous of my (younger and more established) colleagues who were able to spent the whole thematic semester there (I had young children who could not move to Minneapolis at the time).

Affiliation: 
Electrical & Computer Engineering, University of Minnesota
Current Position: 
Professor

For over a quarter of a century IMA has been a model institute for Mathematics and its Applications. True to the letter, IMA fostered collaborations across many disciplines by bringing together mathematicians, statisticians, engineers, physicists, economists, biologists, etc. It has impacted the careers and intellectual horizons of countless researchers including myself. I have been at many other mathematics institutes in the US and abroad (Fields, Mittag-Leffler, IPAM, Newton, Oberwolfach, etc.) and it is my firm opinion that IMA is special. Particular aspects of the IMA that have not been replicated include the Postdoctoral and Industrial Postdoctoral programs and the focus on Applications of Mathematics to Science and Engineering. Since its inception, IMA has always been an indispensable resource to the applied mathematics community, a melting pot for young academics and scientists, and an institution of a tremendous intellectual value.

Affiliation: 
Rice University and University of Washington
Current Position: 
Retired

I spent January through March of 2003 at IMA as a visitor during the optimization year. It was very rewarding to interact so much with the postdocs and the welcoming UM faculty. They worked me very hard, but I felt that all of my effort was rewarding. I wrote a paper with a student of mine and an IMA postdoc. They have gone on to write more papers together. IMA has never become complacent, and it has continued as a center for mathematics research.

Affiliation: 
Mathematical Sciences at University of Cincinnati
Current Position: 
Professor

Other than the Universities I worked at, the IMA deserves the most credit for establishing my career. I spent the entire Summer of 1987 as a visitor and also attended Army conferences in 1990 and 1991. These visits enhanced my work on Cahn-Hilliard models and introduced me to viscoelastic problems.I attended workshops on Industrial Mathematics in 1994 and 1995 that led to many career enhancements including new knowledge of Applied Mathematics (Perturbations methods), design of new courses and many research papers. I had a sabbatical in 1997-1998 where I collaborated with Bernardo Cockburn and Fadil Santosa introduced me to good problems in Electromagnetism. A conference on Mathematical Modeling in the Biosciences led to another career shift to Neuroscience and, again, many research papers. This shift was enhanced by the New Directions Short Course in 2003.

Affiliation: 
Anna University, India
Current Position: 
Assistant Professor

I had the great opportunity to attend the IMA workshop Algebraic topology in Dynamics, differential equations and experimental data in February 2014. It was a wonderful experience to listen to lectures by experts from various disciplines. The way experts from different disciplines form a group and work together is amazing. The myth that pure maths has nothing to do with applications in science and engineering is broken. I got a new direction in research. My heartfelt thanks to IMA.

Affiliation: 
University of Oslo
Current Position: 
Professor

I have been visiting the IMA a number of times during the last 10 - 15 years for periods from one week to one month. These visits have had a substantial impact on my research activity. In particular, I have been exposed to new ideas and topics, and have obtained new research contacts. Furthermore, all the practical arrangements related to travel and accommodation have always been very good.

Affiliation: 
Los Alamos National Laboratory
Current Position: 
Staff

My long-term visit to the IMA and follow up have had a significant impact on the direction of my research since. Being able to interact with other visitors, especially on the applied math side, help provide a fresh perspective and renewed appreciation of rigor in regard to issues that I had been dealing with for a long time. Most invigorating and stimulating.

Affiliation: 
University of Minnesota
Current Position: 
Professor Emeritus

The IMA has played a major role in my life. I was head of the School of Mathematics at Minnesota in 1978 when George Sell, Hans Weinberger and I developed a proposal to the mathematical sciences division of the National Science Foundation to establish a mathematics institute. Our vision was a center that focused on solving problems on the interface between mathematics, the other sciences, engineering and industry, with heavy interaction between researchers in those fields. Among all institute proposals to the NSF at that time, our proposal was unique in its interdisciplinary and industrial orientation and we were successful in establishing the IMA. In those early years, as head of the School of Mathematics, I was very much involved in building the infrastructure and support for the IMA. In 1986 we managed to recruit Avner Friedman to be the new IMA director and I became associate director to support his initiatives. Among these initiatives was a strengthening of the IMA-industry relationship, the establishment of the industrial postdoc program at the IMA and also NSF-wide, the establishment of an industrial mathematics track in the School of Mathematics, and an IMA summer mathematical modeling workshop for graduate students. Later I served as IMA director for 4 years. My personal research benefited greatly from interactions with IMA visitors and programs. In particular, through the IMA interdisciplinary programs I learned about wavelets, radar and sonar, compressive sensing and signal processing in general, all of which led to papers and books. My contacts with IMA visitors Raphael Levine (a chemist), Mike Tratnik, Lee Rubel, Steve Damelin, Willam Wood (Corning Inc.) and Michal Mlejnek (Corning Inc.) , all resulted in joint papers. In the last few years I have mentored over a dozen undergraduate students on individual research problems and honors theses. Seven of these projects were directly motivated by IMA workshops and industrial collaborations: radar and sonar (2), compressive sensing (3), and matrix nearness problems (2). I have interacted with dozens of IMA postdocs in a mentoring capacity and have been very pleased with their achievements in later life. The IMA has made a huge impact on the mathematical sciences and, while I am very sad about the NSF withdrawal of sponsorship, I am confident that the IMA model for research and training in the “interface” will continue.

Affiliation: 
Diablo Valley College
Current Position: 
Professor of Mathematics

I was a postdoctoral fellow during the 2000--2001 IMA Thematic Year on the Mathematics of Multimedia. I filed my dissertation four months into my postdoc, largely due to a conversation that then-IMA Director Willard Miller had with my advisor. The IMA enabled me to complete my PhD and continue my postdoctoral research on variational methods for digital image processing.

Affiliation: 
University of Minnesota twin cities
Current Position: 
Ph.D. student

I am Ph.D. student in Engineering. I went to a IMA talk three years ago by accident because it was in the Electrical Engineering building. That was about two months after I came to University of Minnesota. Since then I knew the name of IMA and went to their talks more often. During the last three years, I have benefited a lot from the different kinds of talks in IMA and that is one of the reasons I decided to pursuit a minor in Mathematics. Last summer (2014) I attended a three-week long workshop in control theory and its application. That was a wonderful experience. It was a good chance to know other people and what they are doing. Though it was a workshop in control, not everyone there works directly in this area. Some of them works on physics, some of them works on optimization and some of them in other areas. People went to this workshop to seek to understand possible connections between different areas. It was really helpful and useful.

Affiliation: 
IMA
Current Position: 
Postdoctoral Research Fellow

The IMA has had an enormous impact on the beginnings of my career as a mathematician. One of the first conferences I attended was the 2009 IMA Short Course on Applied Algebraic Topology. It was at this course that I first learned from Robert Ghrist about applications of topology to coverage problems in (mobile) sensor networks, and in particular, one problem that Ghrist shared with the conference participants later became the topic of my PhD thesis.

I was excited to return to the IMA as a postdoctoral fellow for the 2013-2014 thematic year on Scientific and Engineering Applications of Algebraic Topology. It is hard to imagine a better place to be as a postdoc than at an IMA thematic year. With 6 weeklong conferences, many short-term visitors, and a friendly crew of long-term visitors at all levels of seniority (grad students, fellow postdocs, professors from a wide variety of liberal arts and research institutions), the IMA thematic year is an ideal situation for a postdoc to meet, network, and collaborate with the members of their field. I am now applying for faculty positions, and it is telling that all three of my letter writers were heavily involved in the IMA thematic year.

Though the IMA is ramping down in the next few years, it's influence on my career will continue for decades as I collaborate with mathematicians that I first met (or first got to know well) while at the IMA. The IMA excels at bringing mathematicians together to share and collaborate in meaningful and long-lasting ways.

I'd like to thank all of the directors and all of the staff members at the IMA. The directors have always led with the best interests of their visitors and postdocs in mind. Additionally, I have been consistently impressed at the fantastic job that the staff at the IMA does of organizing workshops, conferences, public lectures, and outreach programs. In particular, the IT team has gone above and beyond to assist me with my computer needs. The level of professionalism, hospitality, and helpfulness of the staff at the IMA has played a huge role in the numerous successful research collaborations that began at the IMA. Thank you to the IMA, to its directors, and to its staff for the enormous positive impact you have had on my career.

Affiliation: 
Brown University
Current Position: 
Associate Professor

Since 2005 I have attended several workshops. All of them have lead to stimulating discussions and many times lead to new collaborations. The fact that Faculty of Minnesota frequently have attended the workshops I attended, and they are world experts in the topics has made the experiences even better!

Affiliation: 
the University of Warsaw
Current Position: 
full professor

I loved coming to the IMA. I visited it three times. This has been a great place to pick up a new idea,
make new friends and talk to the right person, when stuck in work. All of these happened to me during my visits.

Affiliation: 
University of Arizona
Current Position: 
Assistant Professor

I attended a number of workshops at the IMA from the end of my graduate studies through the beginning of my time as an assistant professor. On every visit, I left with new research ideas and new contacts in the field; many of the people I met through IMA workshops have been essential to the progression of my career. I am greatly thankful for all the opportunities that the IMA provided for me.

Affiliation: 
University of Minnesota
Current Position: 
Professor of Pharmaceutics and Biomedical Engineering

As a faculty member at the University of Minnesota, I have been constantly on the lookout for topics at IMA, and have attended and presented at several workshops. The opportunity to connect with applied mathematicians has been gratifying, and even led to some collaborations.

The IMA is also to be commended for its series of outstanding public lecturers.

The staff has always been extremely helpful, and in most recent years I have enjoyed the large wintergreen life savers that have been offered at IMA functions!

Affiliation: 
The Ohio State University
Current Position: 
Dr Charles Saltzer Professor of Mathematics

I have benefited greatly from the IMA during my long career, beginning in 1983 (just about when the IMA began) as a workshop visitor during an early program. The benefit -- having a place to exchange ideas about current research and the directions I was planning to take -- was so clear that I jumped at the invitation to serve on the organizing committee of the program -- integrable systems and multidimensional conservation laws -- that took place in 1988-1989. The opportunity to lead such a program was a great benefit, and the program itself led to several immediate collaborations -- with Gerald Warnecke, a postdoc in the program, with David Schaeffer, another organizer -- as well as to contacts with other researchers. At the time, I was a faculty member at the University of Houston, which is a wonderful place but not a place with a large supply of graduate students, so the chance to interact with young people and recruit postdocs was (and is) wonderful. In 1989 I was a long-term visitor, and it was a very productive time because of the stimulating program and the other visitors. In fact, in 1989 there was hardly a field of "multidimensional conservation laws", despite our optimistic title. By 1992 I was working in this field, which now exists, and thrives, and in some measure that is due to the IMA's program.

Since then there have been many more visits and interactions. The most recent was IMA support, under the PI conference program, for a scientific workshop I organized in 2014 at Ohio State for ICIAM representatives. In between, I have helped organize conferences, have participated in mentoring workshops, have participated in research programs, and have served on the Board of Governors.

I suppose that the following could also be considered a benefit: In the mid-90's I was briefly a candidate to become Director. It wouldn't have been a good choice on the part of the University of Minnesota (I was much too inexperienced and vague about plans), and it took another decade before I was ready for such a job (at the Fields Institute in Toronto, where I did fine) but my home institution was sufficiently worried that they offered me the chance to hire someone to keep me there. On my recommendation, UH hired Suncica Canic, who is now in the midst of a brilliant career. In a very real sense, though probably not what you are looking for, this was a benefit to me of the IMA. Oh, and to close the connection: Sunny and I were the team that originated the approach to multidimensional conservation laws that has proved so fruitful.

Thanks, IMA.

Affiliation: 
Worcester Polytechnic Institute
Current Position: 
Professor

I participated in the IMA workshop on Mathematical and Algorithmic Challenges in Electronic Structure Theory, held September 29-October 3, 2008. At the time, I was interested in a certain procedure for accelerating the convergence of fixed-point iterations. Although not generally well known, this procedure had for years been widely and successfully used within the electronic-structure community (referred to there as "Anderson mixing") to accelerate the self-consistent field iteration for determining the electronic structure of atomic and molecular ensembles. During the workshop, I made several connections that were crucial to advancing my understanding of the method. In addition to helpful discussions with Juan Meza and Chao Yang, I mention in particular several conversations with Youssef Saad, who told me of recent results by him and his collaborator Haw-Ren Fang that clarified and extended a remarkable relationship of Anderson mixing to quasi-Newton updating. These interactions greatly influenced a paper that a PhD student and I subsequently wrote on the method, in which we described some of its theoretical properties and illustrated its effectiveness in a variety of applications. This paper has been well cited and, I believe, has contributed to a recent upsurge of interest in the method and its applications.

Affiliation: 
SUNYIT
Current Position: 
Assistant Professor

The IMA has helped us tremendously!! As faculty from a small college without travel budget we had the opportunity to participate and to present a poster at one of the finest workshops (SPD-PDE) I have seen so far. We could see many great talks by leading experts in the area. We meet with our collaborator and we made new connections (which seem to lead to new collaborations.) Without funding we would not have been able to attend the workshop. Funding and the opportunity to present a poster was also the essential argument for our institution why attending this workshop is crucial for our work.

Affiliation: 
University of British Columbia
Current Position: 
Faculty

The workshop in which I took part was inspirational for me in that it allowed me to connect with a group of researchers somewhat outside my normal field of work. I had very much enjoyed the meeting, and while it is hard to point at any single paper as coming from the meeting, it had a clear influence on my research.

Affiliation: 
Mississippi State University
Current Position: 
Assistant Professor

I recently benefitted from the IMA's theme year on Discrete Structures, and particularly from the workshop on Geometric and Enumerative Combinatorics. The workshop had an exceptional slate of speakers. I particularly recall that the organizers had made an effort to include people with different perspectives, and not everyone was from my "tribe" of mathematicians. Learning about some of the mathematics being done by people in surrounding areas was a particularly valuable consequence of the workshop. It was a wonderful week of talking about old and new problems.

Affiliation: 
Iowa State university
Current Position: 
Distinguished Professor Emeritus, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

IMA Minneapolis, Minnesota has served the mathematics and statistics communities in the midwest , the US , Canda, and the world very well. The return for the dollar spent has been excellent. In my own subject of probability theory and its applications the many conferences and special weeks that IMA arranged have been very helpful. I have had excellent interactions when I visited IMA.Many of my research papers have resulted from joint work done at IMA.
Please do reconsider the decision and let the IMA continue to flourish here in the midwest.

Affiliation: 
Queen's University
Current Position: 
Professor

I was a postdoctoral researcher at the IMA in 1992-93. While there I worked with several researchers from other countries whom I’d never otherwise have had the opportunity to collaborate with. One of those researchers was Jan Willems, who was visiting the IMA as a long-term visitor. After we worked at the IMA, Jan invited me to visit him in Groningen, the Netherlands, for a month to do research together. That trip led to other invitations to speak all over the Netherlands. My year at the IMA felt magical to me. It was intellectually energizing. More than that, it was the embodiment of a true scholarly setting—one that now as a professor who has to juggle teaching, research and administration, I desperately miss.

Affiliation: 
NYU
Current Position: 
Professor

One of my best research places is the IMA. I was invited few times to workshops and always had a very good time.
During the year 2009-2010, I even asked the organizers to invite me to attend few workshops.
During that year the IMA had a Thematic Year on Complex Fluids and Complex Flows. This was an occasion for me to learn
the more applied side of some of these polymeric flows on which I have been working.

The main ideas of one of my best papers
"Global existence of weak solutions to the FENE dumbbell model of polymeric flows. Invent. Math. 191 (2013), no. 2, 427–500"
were developed during one of these workshops. The IMA's good environment is acknowledged in that paper.

Affiliation: 
Carnegie Mellon University
Current Position: 
Professor of Operations Research

I have the fortune to participate in several workshops at IMA during my time as a junior faculty. The institute's superb environment, flawless organization, and level of scientific excellence were amazing learning and networking opportunities. The time I spent at IMA had a major influence in my research and development. I will always be immensely grateful for that.

Affiliation: 
CSU Channel Islands
Current Position: 
Associate Professor

I've been to a few IMA workshops on shape analysis, each of which introduced me to new people and new ideas. The most recent workshop was for women in mathematics, where I was a "senior" woman. Relationships I made during that short three days continue to today, including one with a young graduate student we hired as new faculty last year. Another new faculty hire participated in WAM! at IMA the year before we hired her. These kinds of events are life-changing in ways that are hard to capture in surveys and data. They create community, spark research ideas, build community and confidence. IMA has been steadfastly devoted to broadening participation of and to providing solid research foundation for fledgling mathematicians of all stripes.

Affiliation: 
California State University Northridge
Current Position: 
Professor

I participated in the activities at the IMA as a postdoc and later as a long term visitor in the thematic program on Simulating Our Complex World in Fall 2010. It needs to be said that the IMA does an outstanding job in selecting its programs and designing its activities! The directors are extremely successful in addressing all important trends in mathematics. Their work results in lasting impacts on the participants' careers. I had a very memorable time at the IMA learning new things, asking questions to famous mathematicians and trying new ideas! From many high profile workshops that I attended at the IMA one had very important consequences to my career. It was a topical workshop with Metronic on challenges in manufacturing implant devices. It was in this workshop that for the first time I was able to see just how difficult are realistic numerical simulations and how big are the needs for them in sciences and engineering. The amount of problems that await to be solved is enormous! This workshop inspired me to apply for a position in the Air Force Research Laboratory where I worked with aerospace engineers on developing tools for simulating gas flows involved in high speed high altitude flight. In this way, IMA inspired a very positive change in my career!

In 2013 I was the leading organizer for the workshop on Issues in Solving the Boltzmann Equation for Aerospace Applications that was sponsored by AFOSR and that combined talks by accomplished mathematicians and aerospace engineers. The workshop took place at ICERM in June of 2013 and was extremely successful. However, it became apparent early on that the strongly applied content of the workshop is somewhat outside of the traditional scope of the ICERM activities. The IMA has been extremely successful in bringing mathematics and industry together! I will be hoping to conduct the follow up workshop at the IMA!

Affiliation: 
Smith College
Current Position: 
Professor

My first year out of PhD I spent at the IMA, and teaching at the university. I cannot think of a better environment for a young researcher. Because of the theme of the year, the postdocs were all working in related fields. We created ties, learned from one another. The conferences peppering the year helped us showcase our research to a wide audience in our general field. My research was really propelled by the group enthusiasm, the synergies and the feeling that we were together at the frontier of knowledge. I can say without hesitation that the IMA launched my career.

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